BAIRD BLOWS $6.5 MILLION ON LIGHT RAIL ADVERTISING

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Taxpayers have forked out a whopping $6.5 million for the Baird Government’s Tomorrow’s Sydney campaign – making it the most expensive government advertising blitz in the last seven years.

Documents obtained by the NSW Opposition under FOI show the total cost so far has included $1.57 million on concept development and production, $1.47 million on outdoor media and $1.48 million on digital and mobile displays. 

The cost is astronomically higher than the average advertising campaign spend during the last financial year – which was only $209,250 during 2014-15. 

The cost is also much higher than comparable public service campaigns, including: 

  • RBT Means You Need a Plan B (2014-15) $2,638,154;
  • Double Demerits (2014-15) $742,747;
  • Speed Cameras (2013-14) $1,798,265; and
  • Fatigue (2013-14) $1,375,819.

Tomorrow’s Sydney is significantly higher than every one of the NSW Government’s most expensive advertising campaigns over the last seven financial years. 

Year

Agency

Campaign

Cost ($)

2015-16

Transport for NSW

Tomorrow’s Sydney

6,467,899

2014-15

Transport for NSW

Opal Card

3,847,370

2013-14

Transport for NSW

Don’t Rush

3,846,120

2012-13

Transport for NSW

Don’t Rush

3,705,253

2011-12

RMS

Speeding

2,781,766

2010-11

Environment, Climate Change and Water

Energy Efficiency

3,402,134

2009-10

Energy Australia

Brand Campaign

5,675,866

2008-09

NSW Lotteries

Oz Lotto

3,534,981


Quotes attributable to Opposition Wastewatch Committee Chair Chris Minns
 

“This is a $6.5 million taxpayer funded apology to the people of Sydney for the construction chaos they’re about to endure thanks to CBD Light Rail.” 

“Tomorrow’s Sydney is a taxpayer funded PR campaign that delivers no important information or message. Taxpayers shouldn't have to fork out $6.5 million to inform them they're about to have a bad day.” 

“This campaign is all about telling commuters to stop whinging about the massive disruption they’ll face over the next three years and basically suck it up.” 

“Taxpayers are footing one of the biggest bills for government advertising in recent history – nearly twice the amount of most other comparable campaigns over the last seven years.”